Category: Early Careers

Registration open and bursaries available for ESACT-UK 2019

Drayton Manor Hotel, Tamworth – 9 -10 January 2019

We are looking to continue the increased proportion of early researchers in the scientific programme through a more extensive bursary programme, so if you are an early career researcher (within 7 years of completing a BSc) and would like to present your work, please submit a high quality scientific abstract for oral or poster presentation to Qasim Rafiq. The ESACT-UK organising committee will  select candidates for a full bursary (dependent on abstract being relevant to cell culture, committee decision is final). This includes a free ticket for both days, plus accommodation, all refreshments and the conference dinner. Deadline for abstracts is Friday 14 September 2018.

All attending early career researchers will be eligible for the prize for the best presentation (£500 bursary for an event of their choice) and best poster (£250 bursary for an event of their choice).

The early stage researcher must be a member of ESACT-UK, but it is free to join for students.If applying for a bursary, please do not register via the website. Should an application be successful, researchers will be sent a code to register.

ESACT website: http://www.esactuk.org.uk

PhD: Novel bioprocessing strategies for the production of functional magnetic nanoparticles

Aston University –  Birmingham, UK School of Engineering and Applied Science

Applications are invited for a three-year Postgraduate studentship, supported by the School of Engineering and Applied Science, to be undertaken within the Aston Institute of Materials Research (AIMR) and the European Bioenergy Research Institute (EBRI) groups. The successful applicant will join an established experimental group working on the production of functional and biologically synthesised materials for healthcare and biotechnological applications.

PDRA position: downsized cell-derived peptides as potent inhibitors of alpha-synuclein toxicity

Dr Jody Mason’s lab at the University of Bath is looking for a bright and enthusiastic individual who is interested in using a new and cutting edge peptide library screening approach to derive functional peptide-based antagonists of alpha-Synuclein (aS) associated toxicity. The project is wide-ranging and will involve extensive molecular biology, peptide synthesis, and protein biochemistry to derive functional antagonists and to characterise their mechanism of action (see Cheruvara et al., J Biol Chem 2015). The project is highly collaborative and will be undertaken in collaboration with partners at Bath and the University of Queensland to provide a detailed picture of how antagonists function, including their ability to block aS associated toxicity both in vitro and within live neuronal cells, The project will require travel in the UK and possibly beyond.

PDRA position: functionally active peptide inhibitors of transcription factor activity

Dr Jody Mason’s lab at the University of Bath is looking for a bright and enthusiastic individual who is interested in using a new and cutting edge peptide library screening approach to derive functional peptide-based antagonists of transcription factor activity. The project is wide-ranging and will involve extensive molecular biology, peptide synthesis, and protein biochemistry to derive functional antagonists and to characterise their mechanism of action (see Baxter et al. ACS Chem Biol, 2017). The project is highly collaborative and will be undertaken in collaboration with partners in the UK and the University of Queensland to provide a detailed picture of how antagonists function, including their ability to block transcription of target genes, The project will require travel in the UK and possibly beyond.

PDRA position: functionally active peptide inhibitors of transcription factor activity

Dr Neil Kad’s lab at the University of Kent is looking for a bright and enthusiastic individual who is interested in using state-of-the-art single molecule techniques to image transcription factor interactions with DNA tightropes (see Kad et al., 2010). The project is wide-ranging from protein biochemistry to single molecule data collection and analysis. This project will be undertaken in collaboration with partners and will require travel in the UK and possibly beyond.