Category: Early Careers

PhD: Novel bioprocessing strategies for the production of functional magnetic nanoparticles

Aston University –  Birmingham, UK School of Engineering and Applied Science

Applications are invited for a three-year Postgraduate studentship, supported by the School of Engineering and Applied Science, to be undertaken within the Aston Institute of Materials Research (AIMR) and the European Bioenergy Research Institute (EBRI) groups. The successful applicant will join an established experimental group working on the production of functional and biologically synthesised materials for healthcare and biotechnological applications.

PDRA position: downsized cell-derived peptides as potent inhibitors of alpha-synuclein toxicity

Dr Jody Mason’s lab at the University of Bath is looking for a bright and enthusiastic individual who is interested in using a new and cutting edge peptide library screening approach to derive functional peptide-based antagonists of alpha-Synuclein (aS) associated toxicity. The project is wide-ranging and will involve extensive molecular biology, peptide synthesis, and protein biochemistry to derive functional antagonists and to characterise their mechanism of action (see Cheruvara et al., J Biol Chem 2015). The project is highly collaborative and will be undertaken in collaboration with partners at Bath and the University of Queensland to provide a detailed picture of how antagonists function, including their ability to block aS associated toxicity both in vitro and within live neuronal cells, The project will require travel in the UK and possibly beyond.

PDRA position: functionally active peptide inhibitors of transcription factor activity

Dr Jody Mason’s lab at the University of Bath is looking for a bright and enthusiastic individual who is interested in using a new and cutting edge peptide library screening approach to derive functional peptide-based antagonists of transcription factor activity. The project is wide-ranging and will involve extensive molecular biology, peptide synthesis, and protein biochemistry to derive functional antagonists and to characterise their mechanism of action (see Baxter et al. ACS Chem Biol, 2017). The project is highly collaborative and will be undertaken in collaboration with partners in the UK and the University of Queensland to provide a detailed picture of how antagonists function, including their ability to block transcription of target genes, The project will require travel in the UK and possibly beyond.

PDRA position: functionally active peptide inhibitors of transcription factor activity

Dr Neil Kad’s lab at the University of Kent is looking for a bright and enthusiastic individual who is interested in using state-of-the-art single molecule techniques to image transcription factor interactions with DNA tightropes (see Kad et al., 2010). The project is wide-ranging from protein biochemistry to single molecule data collection and analysis. This project will be undertaken in collaboration with partners and will require travel in the UK and possibly beyond.

STARS School 2018: Embedding the Industrial Perspective

BBSRC Strategic Training Awards for Research Skills (STARS) School 2018: Embedding the Industrial Perspective

For Early Career Researchers: The Bioprocessing Skills School

Do you want to find out how your career might develop working for industry, the differences between industrial- and academic-driven research and how the industrial environment matches your career ambitions?  Here’s your opportunity to answer these questions and find out much more about your ability to work in teams and how the innovative, entrepreneurial spirit drives research translation.

At our week-long, intensive residential training programme, designed around the insights and advice of senior industrialists, you will take part in group-based activities and work with real-life industrial case studies. The programme is designed to engage with the process of entrepreneurship, focus on the development of the ability to promote research ideas and their value to audiences and the key importance of the societal impact of industrial biotechnology.

Are you interested? If you are (a) an Early Career Researcher (normally undergoing PhD training or on first Post-doctoral positioning in an academic environment but potentially in the early stages of an industrial career), (b) working in the area of bioprocessing of biopharmaceuticals or novel biological therapeutics (c) on a project that has an industrial collaborator then this could be an ideal opportunity for you.

The week-long residential programme is funded by the BBSRC (accommodation, meals and all training activities) to eligible applicants but will be limited to no more than 18 participants each year.  Each participant will be asked to make a £150 non-returnable contribution for registration once their acceptance of a place is confirmed. Informal enquiries can be made to Dr Jo Flannelly (joanne.flannelly@manchester.ac.uk).

The programme will be held on 9th-14th September 2018, inclusive, at the National Biologics Manufacturing Centre (NBMC, Centre for Process Innovation, CPI, Darlington) and the week will start with a delegate networking dinner on the evening of Sunday 9th at the hotel.

The BioProcessing Skills School has been developed by the Universities of Manchester and Kent, in collaboration with the NBMC and BioProNET, and is funded by the BBSRC Strategic Training Awards for Research Skills (STARS).

Details of the full programme will follow and the sessions will include: molecular design and development of biological therapeutics, generating the tools for self awareness, industrial-scale manufacturing process, drug formulation and delivery embedded within a series of industrial site visits and presentations from industrial practitioners and entrepreneurs.

Register here: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/STARS_2018_Registration